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Updated: 1 day 18 min ago

An Event Apart: Putting Design in Design Systems

Mon, 03/04/2019 - 2:00pm

In his Putting the 'Design' in Design Systems presentation at An Event Apart in Seattle, Dan Mall talked about the benefits of design systems for designers and how ensure they can be realized. Here's my notes from his talk:

  • Most content in design systems are not for designers but for developers. This helps to scale design efforts when there's a lot more developers than designers (typical in many companies).
  • But where does design and designers fit within a design system? Are they no longer required?
  • Design can be part of strategy and big picture thinking but most designers are good at making designs and iterating them, not working across the company on "big D" design.
  • When it comes time to make a design system, most people start with "let's make some components!". This is problematic because its missing "for ____". What's the purpose of our design system? Who is it for?
  • Design systems need a focus. One company's design system should not work for another company. A good "onlyness" statement can only apply to one company, it would not work for other companies.
  • Design system principles can guide your work. Some are universal like: accessible, simple. Others should be very specific so you can focus on what matters for you.
  • An audit of common components in design systems shows the coverage varies between companies; the components can focus on their core value.
  • Instead of starting with making design components, think about what components you actually need. Then make some pilot screens as proofs of concept for a design system. Will you be able to make the right kinds of things?
  • Don't start at the abstract level, start at the extract level. Take elements from within pilot designs and look for common components to pull out for reuse. Don't try to make it cover all use cases yet. As you work through a few pilots, expand components to cover additional use cases you uncover.
  • The most exciting design systems are boring. About 80% of the components you're making can be covered by your design system. They allow you to remake product experiences quickly. The remaining 20% is what designers still need to do: custom design work.
  • A good design system takes care of the stuff you shouldn't reinvent and allows you to spend time on where it matters.
  • Creative people are driven by autonomy, mastery, and purpose. A good design system will enable all of these.
  • The most common benefits of design systems are greater efficiency and consistency. But another important one is relief from having to do mundane design work. (editor's note: like maintaining & updating a design system!)
  • The real value of a design system is to help us get back to our real work.

An Event Apart: Move Fast and Don’t Break Things

Mon, 03/04/2019 - 2:00pm

In his Move Fast and Don’t Break Things presentation at An Event Apart in Seattle, Scott Jehl shared a number of resilient patterns and tools to help us establish and maintain performant access to our Web sites. Here's my notes from his talk:

  • For successful Web design, people used to suggest we move fast and break things. Today we've become more responsible but things can still break for our users if we're not mindful.
  • So many factors that can compromise the delivery of our Web sites are out of our control. We need to be aware of these in order to build resilience into our designs.
  • We used to use browser detection and feature detection to ensure our sites were supported across Web browsers. Progressive enhancement's importance ballooned as a wide range of new devices for accessing the Web, touch interactions, and more browsers became popular.
  • Trying to make a Web site look and work the same across devices was broken, we realized this was the wrong goal and we need to adapt to varying screens, networks, input types, and more.
  • Some practices stay good. Progressive enhancement and accessibility prepared us for many of these changes but it is also a performance enhancement on its own.
  • Figuring out how to make Web sites faster used to be hard but the tools we have for measuring performance have been improving (like PageSpeedTest and WebPageTest).
Making Web Sites Fast
  • First meaningful content: how soon does a page appear to be useful to a user. Progressive enhancement is about starting with meaningful HTML and then layering additional enhancements on top of it. When browsers render HTML, they look for dependencies in the file (CSS and Javascript) before displaying anything.
  • CSS and Javascript are most often the render-blockers on sites, not images & videos. Decide if they need to load at high priority and if not, load async or defer. If you need them to run right away, consider server push (HTTP2) to send files that you know the browser needs making them ready to render right away.
  • If your server does not support push, you can inline your critical CSS and/or Javascript. Inlining however is bad for caching as it does not get reused by other pages. To get around this you can use the Cache API to inline content and cache it as a file for reuse.
  • Critical CSS tools can look over a series of files and identify the common CSS you need across a number of different pages for initial rendering. If you inline your critical CSS, you can preload the rest of your CSS (not great browser support today).
  • Inlining and push are best for first time visits, for return visits they can be wasteful. We can use cookies for checking for return visits or make use of Service Worker.
  • Time to interactive: time it takes a site to become interactive for the user. We should be aiming for interactivity in under 5seconds on a median mobile phone on 3G. Lower end phones can take a long time to process Javascript after it downloads.
  • More weight does not mean more wait. You can prioritize when things load to make pages render much faster.
Keeping Web Sites Fast
  • Making a web site fast is easier than keeping it fast. Over time, Web sites will add a number of third party services with unknown performance consequences.
  • We can use a number of tools, like Lighthouse, to track performance unfriendly dependencies. Speed Curves will let you set performance budgets and see when things are over. This allows people to ask questions about the costs of what we're adding to sites.
  • Varying content and personalization can increase optimizations but they are costly from a performance perspective since they introduce a second meaningful content render. Moving these features to the server-side can help a lot.
  • Cloudflare has a solution that allows you to manipulate pages on their server before it comes down to browser. These server-side service workers allow you to adjust pages off the client and thereby avoid delays.
  • Homepages and landing pages are often filled with big images and videos. They're difficult to keep performant because the change all the time and are often managed outside of a central CMS.
  • For really image heavy pages, we can use srcset attributes to define multiple sizes of images. Writing this markup can be tricky if written by hand. Little helper apps can allow people to write good code.
  • Soon we'll have a native lazy load feature in browsers for images and iframes. Chrome has it in testing now and can send aspect ratios before actual images.

The Reason for Micromobility

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 2:00pm

At the Micromobility conference in Richmond, CA Horace Dediu talked through why micromobility solutions need to exist and why they are set up to succeed today. Here’s my notes from his talk on The Reason for Micromobility:

  • The wealthiest nations have always been those with the highest rates of urbanization. Across the World, urbanization continues to increase in all countries and is expected to reach 50% in most countries by 2025. 6.7 billion people will live in cities by 2050. This is easy to predict so you can plan on it happening.
  • In cities, people are closer together and interact more. That’s how you create wealth and prosperity so it’s no wonder this trend will grow.
  • The World today consumes kilometers through land, air, and sea kilometers. 52 trillion kilometers are traveled per year across the globe. Half of these miles are in cars and low efficiency. In developed countries today (US and Europe), most trips are in personal vehicles like cars. Some of these car miles need to be reallocated.
  • The most common distance traveled by New York taxis is 1.4 miles. Less than 2% are 5 miles or more. 90% of all cars in trips are less than 20 miles. 162 billion trips per year in the United States are less than ten miles. Short trips consume more time and cost more money than long trips as well.
  • The addressable market for micromobility today is zero to five miles. That adds up to 4 trillion kilometers per year.
  • Cities are going to be the predominant place people live. Short trips are going to be the dominant type of travel. They’ll consume the most time and account for the most consumer spending.
  • There’s a remarkable consistency for modes of travel across the World. Cars are used the same in the US as in the UK and Switzerland. Scooters have a shorter average distance (.4 miles) than e-bikes (.8 miles). Each mode (of transportation) has a clear distance distribution and thereby unique characteristics.
  • We can begin to segment the transportation market by distance traveled. Regardless of vendors, modes of transportation cluster along similar usage models.
  • Given these usage model differences, can we move automobile mobility to micromobility? There’s currently a gap between average car distances and average scooter/bike distances. However we see cabs and powerful 2-wheelers beginning to cross this chasm.
  • There’s trillions of car kilometers that can potentially be moved to more efficient solutions. That’s the challenge for micromobility today.
  • The first experiments in micromobilty have been very successful in delivering many miles. Bird hit 10M rides in 320 days since launch. Lime hit 10M in 400 days. The slope of growth for these companies is steeper than for Uber and Lyft. 100M rides per year is the run rate for several of these companies.
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